New Diagnostic Tool For Alzheimer’s

Many of us have been affected by Alzheimer’s disease in some way. For those that have unfortunately been impacted, we know all too well how difficult it can be for the one suffering as well as their loved ones. We are all hopeful that a medical breakthrough will come about. Until this needed discovery becomes available, we all must do our part to help raise funds, create innovative care and living options, provide education and offer emotional support.

Last weekend the Seacrest Village and Seacrest at Home family participated in the annual Alzheimer’s walk in Oceanside, Ca. We understand how detrimental Alzheimer’s is today as over 5 million people in America suffer from this disease. Unfortunately, the Alzheimer’s Association is expecting these numbers to explodeas our population begins to age. By 2050, they project that nearly 14 million people will be afflicted by the debilitating disease.

One of the biggest challenges with Alzheimer’s disease is that it is very difficult to diagnose early on. However, earlier this week, University of Florida researchers may have discovered a cheap and reliable way to determine if one has Alzheimer’s disease early on in the disease process. They found that patients with early-stage Alzheimer’s had more difficulty smelling peanut butter held at short distances compared to people without Alzheimer’s. More investigation is needed, but if these studies hold true, then we are one step closer to finding an effective intervention for this disease. Graduate student (working on the study )Jennifer Stamps states, “If we can catch it at that earlier stage, we can start treatment more aggressively at that earlier stage, and you can prevent a lot of the progression.” So don’t be surprised ifone day in the near future, a part of your yearly physical might include the peanut butter smell test.

If you are interested in learning more about the study please find more information below.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57606985/cheap-alzheimers-test-made-from-peanut-butter-and-ruler-researchers-report/